Category Archives: Smoke Detectors

Indiana Soup- Story Courtesy of IE3 Business Intelligence for Professional Contractors

Date:
in: Building Performance, Residential Buildings

Image-DewPt-MapI thought I knew all about this topic, but I did not really get a grip on this until a few years ago while preparing to teach the subject. If you’re looking for the ultimate motivator for learning, I highly recommend getting hired to train a room full of experienced contractors so you can stand in front of them and preach, “This is how it is!”

The topic (this time), is moisture. Recall in the past we knew a home had a moisture load (or latent heat load) that needed to be managed, but we also knew our cold AC coil did a remarkable job of sucking the water out of the air. Even if you did not understand the psychrometric chart or read the AC manufacturer’s latent capacity specs, you still learned all about the great moisture removal abilities of an air conditioner the first time you forgot to hook up the condensate pipe. What a mess!

So what have I learned recently that makes me think I deserve your attention for the next few minutes? I now understand the potential water volume in air, and I appreciate the high levels of moisture we have in the Midwest for a large portion of the year.

Don’t stop reading because you have already read about moisture control. You are right, it is a topic frequently talked about today. However, I do not think many in our business are following through and helping the customer understand. It is time for all of us to sign up for a class on moisture. We can no longer ignore our professional responsibility to understand and control the humidity in our customer’s home.

Are you afraid of the psychrometric chart? Well, I am. Maybe not so much afraid as overwhelmed by how much information it reveals. Fortunately, you do not need to know it all. In fact, I do not even “work the chart” in my short class, but let’s remind ourselves on a few of the basics:

  • In the summer, in humid climates, we would like to comfort our homes to about 55% Relative Humidity. A dryer 50% RH is even better.
  • Outside air is beginning to feel uncomfortably humid at a dew point temperature of 60 degrees.
  • Outside air at 60 degree dew point brought inside an air conditioned home at 75 degrees will result in 60% RH. Too high.
  • Outside air at 65 degree dew point brought inside an air conditioned home at 75 degrees will result in 70% RH. Much too high. Bad things can start to happen, depending on how much of this moist air you allow inside.
  • Outside air at 70 degree dew point? Throw me a life jacket and snorkel!

So what? The air conditioner runs and we’re all fine, right? Two things are different now, compared to the past:

  1. Home Performance measures for existing homes (or building energy efficient new homes) helps our homes become more energy efficient, but now the AC runs less.
  2. Sometimes we deliberately suck in outside air that is above 60 degree dew point.

Either of these two actions on their own can cause moisture issues. Having both could be double trouble. Sometimes these measures simply affect the homeowner’s comfort. Sometimes there is so much moisture we cause health and structural problems. Who’s responsible? You. You are the expert. You must understand moisture.

What do you need to do?

The first step is to understand dew point and track it! This is an easy measuring stick for how much water is in the air, and you need to follow it. It’s on your weather app on your phone. Look at this number as frequently as you check the radar. Appreciate that some climates are very humid.

The summer so far in Indiana has been terrible. Wanna see it? Go to WeatherSpark.com. This is my favorite site to view historical Dew Point. The link below is for my city in Indiana, but you can change it to your city. This is a great resource when you learn to navigate through all the adjustments.

Weatherspark-image-f-DewPt

Note the dew point levels during the week I wrote this article. Those are serious moisture levels! Now notice the temperatures (Dry bulb) for this period. Not too hot, and especially if your home is energy efficient like mine, then there is not too much load on the AC.

My geothermal heat pump did not run too much that week, and not nearly enough for adequate moisture removal, but I was very comfortable thanks to my whole house dehumidifier. Fortunately, I did not let much of that Indiana soup into my home, other than a few, normal exhaust fan run times, clothes dryer exhaust, and normal door traffic. I condition to a very comfortable 76 degrees and 45% RH. Half my home is over a basement and the other over a sealed crawl space, and both are dry and odor free.

This is not the way it was in the past. I love the outdoors and in the past I kept my home open as much as possible. Odors grew downstairs, and spent portable dehumidifiers piled up in the basement.

Not so anymore! Once I condition my home in terms of temperature, humidity, and even pollens and dust, then I like to keep it that way. Sure, I still keep a lookout for “fresh” air and bring it in when it is available, but for some stretches of time in the Midwest, “fresh” is rare and I do not intentionally allow the Indiana soup to get into my home.

What about mandatory residential ventilation? (Oops, will you look at that. We are almost out of room for this article and we will need to cut it short.) Briefly, until we have more time, yes fresh air makes sense; lots of it for some situations, much less for others. But with what I know about moisture, I think we are blindly rushing into problems with indiscriminate ventilation. Ventilation timing and moisture knowledge is critical. In many areas, ventilation strategies must include a dehumidifier. And by the way: An ERV is not a Dehumidifier. (Related article http://www.ie3media.com/erv/)

Incidentally, I could go for a good dose of fresh air right now. Let’s see, checking the dew point map, I wonder what size duct I might need to bring in 100 cfm of fresh air from Ely, Minnesota to Indianapolis?

A Long Cold Winter Predicted

Jaymie Hunckler

This blog post is courtesy of Jaymie Hunckler, Account Manager at Jackson Systems.

Stock up on your hats and gloves now (or rather your hot surface igniters and thermocouples); winter is just around the corner! If you’re an advocate of the Farmer’s Almanac, prepare now – this winter is going to be a doozy!

Calling this winter the “Days of Shivery”, the Farmers’ Almanac is forecasting a winter that will experience below average temperatures for about two-thirds of the United States. While nationwide, last winter was relatively mild, less a few end of season ‘blizzards’, the nation’s coldest temperatures this year will stretch from the Northeast, through the Southeast, Midwest and Southern plains, with above average precipitation rates. What does all this mean? Batten down the hatches, boys, the snow is ON.ITS.WAY (although it is predicted the Pacific Northwest and West Coasts will experience a drier, warmer winter).

Now, it’s easy to challenge the Farmers’ Almanac prediction. The almanac claims an 80% success rate in weather predictions, though many, especially meteorologists refute the 80% success rate claim. Because the almanac doesn’t actually share its mathematical equation for weather prediction, instead indicating that the “top secret” formula is based off of past weather patterns, sunspot activities, and other phenomenon. Even more interesting, the Farmers’ Almanac will not disclose the true identity of its forecast predictor, identifying him simply as “Caleb Weatherbee”.

Regardless of whether or not you take the Farmers’ Almanac predictions to heart, colder weather is coming – and it’s coming sooner rather than later. Preparation is key in the HVAC industry, as system failures and other malfunctions are the only true predictables each winter.

The last thing any contractor wants is to find himself without critical supplies when on a jobsite. In order to serve as a stronger all-around resource for all our contractors, and help ensure all of our clients are as prepared as possible, Jackson Systems is proud to announce that we are now offering Honeywell Combustion products. Contractors may choose from a line-up of new products, such as hot surface igniters, thermocouples, fan timers, contactors, pilot controls and oil burner control units. For more information, check out the products page on the Jackson Systems website: Honeywell Combustion Products

Feel free to contact us anytime at 1-888-652-9663 for more information or to request a quote.

Duct Mounted Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Jackson Systems is now stocking duct mounted CO sensors.  The new SL-701 detector samples the air stream at the AHU supply or return.  In the event dangerous levels of CO are detected, the SL-701 will shut down the AHU to prevent the spread of harmful gas to the occupied space. The SL-701 CO detector wires similar to the duct mounted smoke detector commercial HVAC contractors are familiar with. 

The SL-701 comes as a kit containing everything you need for installation; 

Duct mounted Co Detector

Sampling Tubes

Remote accessory with audible and LED alarm indications

Mounting template and hardware

For more information on the SL-701, please contact us at 888-652-9663 or visit us online at www.jacksonsystems.com.

Innovative Controls from Jackson Systems – right at your fingertips!

Jackson Systems manufactures some of the most innovative control products in the HVAC marketplace.  Jackson Systems' forced air control products are reliable, versatile and simple to install.  All of these products are now easily reviewed in one, convenient location.  The interactive catalog from Jackson Systems is an easy way to view what's new within their product lines.  Check out the latest products from Jackson Systems by clicking on this link:   Jackson Systems Catalog

You might be surprised at some of the opportunities to improve your clients' comfort with simple products that you may not know even existed.  Also, over the next several months, Jackson Systems will be releasing several new products.  The catalog will be updated to reflect these new additions.  Please be on the look out for notification of these releases.  You can also check back often to see the latest version of the catalog

Finally, because our interactive catalog is available online, access to the information is available 24/7.   Jackson Systems is proud to manufacture simple to install products and are happy to offer an equally easy to use resource.

Catalog Cover2

Wiring three SL-2000 Smoke Detectors to one audible alarm

In some applications you may need to wire three (3) SL-2000 smoke detectors to one (1) audible alarm or strobe. This is easily accomplished in three (3) steps.

  • Power all the smoke detectors by the same power supply
  • Wire the smoke detectors together for common alarm shutdown
  • Wire the alarm to one of the smoke detectors.

Powering all of the smoke detectors by the same common power supply is the first step. This ensures that whenever one of the alarm trips you will open the circuit, interrupting voltage supply to the fan. Power to the detectors is given to the detectors by terminals 9 and 10. Shutting the fan down is typically done by using terminals 7 and 18 on any of the smoke detectors.

Wiring the smoke detectors together for common alarm shutdown is needed so that when one smoke detector goes into alarm, all of the smoke detectors will go into alarm. This is accomplished with the SL-2000 by using terminals 12 (alarm link +) and 20 (Aux power out +). Wire all three terminal 12’s in series. Then wire all there terminal 20’s in series.

Now all three smoke detectors are wired for common alarm shutdown.

Lastly wire the alarm to any one of the smoke detectors. Wire terminal 17(NO alarm contact) to the positive wire of the horn or strobe. Wire terminal 19 (Aux power out – ) to the negative wire of the horn or strobe. Place a jumper wire between terminal 20 (aux power out +) and terminal 6 (Common alarm contact).

Following these three steps will ensure that when any one of your smoke detectors trips, the fan will shut down and your audible or visual alarm will go off.

 

For more information about Jackson Systems or the SL-2000 Smoke Detectors, visit us at www.jacksonsystems.com or call 888-652-9663.

Smoke Detectors

Smoke Detectors are a crucial control in any commercial building for early detection of smoke and products of combustion present in air moving through HVAC ducts.  They are designed to prevent the recirculation or spread of smoke by air handling equipment, fans, or blowers.  These systems can be shut down in the event of smoke detection.  Smoke detectors usually come as ionization or photoelectric detectors.  Jackson Systems smoke detectors have output terminals to provide access to remote accessories such as horns, strobes, remote status indicators, and test/reset key switches.  Some of the features of the smoke detectors that Jackson Systems stock is:

-Low Flow Technology

-Connect up to 30 units for common functions

-front or rear loading and removing of sampling tubes

-sampling tube sizes of 2.5ft, 5ft, or 10ft

-Testing of smoke detector without cover removal

-“No-Tools required” for installation

-Easy wiring and installation

-Flashing LED on head indicates normal operation.

The smoke detectors that we have in stock are UL & CUL listed, CSFM listed, and MEA accepted.

Air Products and Controls Training Event

Send all your technicians and sales staff to learn about…

  • Smoke, its effects and control within the HVAC environment
  • Where, why and how duct smoke detectors are required and used
  • Proper selection, installation, testing and maintenance
  • Available resources for smoke detectors

Training Information

Date:            Wednesday, April 8, 2009

Place:          Jackson Systems
                   5418 Elmwood Avenue
                   Indianapolis, IN 46203

Time:           5:00pm to 7:30pm
                   Dinner Provided

RSVP:        Please RSVP with Doug Engel and indicate name(s) and email(s) of who will be attending from your company

Phone:        317-788-6800
Toll-Free:     888-652-9663
Fax:            317-227-1034
E-mail:        doug.engel@jacksonsystems.com

Jackson Systems’ Smoke Detectors

Smoke Detectors are a crucial control in any commercial building for early detection of smoke and products of combustion present in air moving through HVAC ducts.  They are designed to prevent the recirculation or spread of smoke by air handling equipment, fans, or blowers.  These systems can be shut down in the event of smoke detection.  Smoke detectors usually come as ionization or photoelectric detectors.  Jackson Systems smoke detectors have output terminals to provide access to remote accessories such as horns, strobes, remote status indicators, and test/reset key switches.  Some of the features of the smoke detectors that Jackson Systems stock is:

 

-Low Flow Technology

-Connect up to 30 units for common functions

-front or rear loading and removing of sampling tubes

-sampling tube sizes of 2.5ft, 5ft, or 10ft

-Testing of smoke detector without cover removal

-“No-Tools required” for installation

-Easy wiring and installation

-Flashing LED on head indicates normal operation. 

 

The smoke detectors that we have in stock are UL & CUL listed, CSFM listed, and MEA accepted.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...